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Comments

  Aethon 11. May 2011, 18:46

I bought this coin from Pegasi Numismatics. It actually weighs 4.12 grams.
  Muenze81 30. Apr. 2011, 20:58

Leider nicht. Habe diesen bisher nur einmal in einer Sammlerbörse in Dortmund gesehen. Sollte dort 4.300 Euro kosten
  Pscipio 14. Apr. 2011, 21:16

This is a fake from modern dies, cf. IAPN BOC Vol 18 (1993), no. 2.

Lars Rutten
  michelprieur 6. Apr. 2011, 21:01

C'est un Prieur 319
  titi 21. Mar. 2011, 19:36

je dispose de monnaies de ce type puis-je les envoyer pour estimation
  polyptychon 10. Mar. 2011, 15:12

Medusenhaupt - kein Helios
  Solachon 26. Feb. 2011, 16:05

This piece does not seem to be of Constantinople fabrique. It rather appears to be from Roman mint corresponding to Sear 291 (but with a dot on the globus cruciger). Has anyone come across similar exemplars?
  scotti12 26. Feb. 2011, 07:30

found one of these while walking a scenic volcanic trail in south australia and curious to know more about it if anyone can help. thanks.
  LynRobinson 21. Feb. 2011, 15:57

Condition circulated to fine.
Could any one provide a rough guide for the value of this coin please.
  apmunoz 31. Jan. 2011, 20:04

The conjoined busts are actually President Mariano Melgarejo in the back and his Secretary of State, Director of Foreign Affairs and Director of Finance, Mariano Donato Muñoz in the foreground.
  apmunoz 31. Jan. 2011, 17:10

The conjoined busts are actually President Mariano Melgarejo in the back and his Secretary of State, Director of Foreign Affairs and Director of Finance, Mariano Donato Muñoz in the foreground.
  apmunoz 31. Jan. 2011, 17:09

The conjoined busts are actually President Mariano Melgarejo in the back and his Secretary of State, Director of Foreign Affairs and Director of Finance, Mariano Donato Muñoz in the foreground.
  apmunoz 31. Jan. 2011, 16:31

The conjoined busts are actually President Mariano Melgarejo in the back and his Secretary of State, Director of Foreign Affairs and Director of Finance, Mariano Donato Muñoz in the foreground.
  Pscipio 12. Jan. 2011, 23:54
  antoninus1 5. Jan. 2011, 17:41

Die vierte Gußfälschung dieses Typs bei CNG.
  antoninus1 5. Jan. 2011, 17:40

Noch einmal diese Gußfälschung.
  antoninus1 5. Jan. 2011, 17:39

Gleiche Fälschung wie die vorhergehende Nummer dieser Auktion.
  antoninus1 5. Jan. 2011, 17:38

Diese Münze scheint eine Gußfälschung zu sein. Ich habe einen Artikel aus dem Numismatischen Nachrichtenblatt 7/99 gefunden, in dem 4 weitere dieser Stücke vorgestellt werden. Sie sind nicht nur "stempelgleich", sondern haben auch die gleichen Fehlstellen (z.B. die Kerbe auf dem Av. bei 15.00 Uhr)
  cepasaccus 3. Jan. 2011, 15:36

Hab jetzt doch aehnliche gefunden. Wuerde deshalb sagen echt.
  cepasaccus 3. Jan. 2011, 15:26

Ist dieses Stueck echt? Dass es unverkauft ist und sich im Stil von den anderen unterscheidet laesst mich daran zweifeln.
  Seleukos 3. Jan. 2011, 06:16

Christodoulos struck fake from known dies of Christodoulos

This coin is from Christodoulos dies 520 (reverse) and 521 (obverse) as documented by J.N. Svoronos in “Synopsis de Mille Coins Faux du Faussaire C. Christodoulos” (1922)
Refer: http://snible.org/coins/christodoulos/

Diagnostics of the fake:

1) Die match to known Christodoulos dies 520 (reverse) and 521 (obverse)
2) Low weight: 0.5 gms or 3.6% less that the relevant gold standard of 13.9 gm
3) The unique and inappropriate (for a deified Arsinoe issue) reverse typology with a single rather than double cornucopia.
4) The reverse depiction of a string like fillet around the cornucopia rather than a broader royal diadem

Further discussion:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/fakes/displayimage.php?pos=-10154
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=67812.0
  Seleukos 3. Jan. 2011, 06:09

Struck/Pressed Fake Antiochos II Drachm of Ai Khanoum Mint

This coin is associated with the group of high quality Bactrian Antiochos II fakes, dating perhaps to the late 19th century, as described by G.K Jenkins in A Group of Bactrian Forgeries, Revue Numismatique, 1965 Volume 6, Number 7, pages 51-57.

Critical aspects bearing on this consideration include:

Die Axis: Most tellingly, the die axis of the coin is 1h. This is inconsistent with the Ai Khanoum mint standard of dies adjusted to 6h. Refer: Houghton & Lorber (Seleucid Coins), Newell (The Coinage of the Eastern Seleucid Mints) and Kritt (Seleucid Coins of Bactria and Dynastic Transitions in the Coinage of Bactria). All of the known genuine gold and silver coinage of the Seleucid and Diodotid period, which bears the mint controls of Ai Khanoum have a 6h die axis. It is well documented that the mint struck coins with adjusted 6h dies. In contrast, many of the forgeries catalogued by Jenkins are characterised by other die axis orientations with a bias towards 12h.

Weight: The coin weighs 4.52 grams, which is 8% heavier than the attic weight standard drachm of 4.2 grams to which all the documented authentic examples of drachms of the mint at Ai Khanoum conform. Review of the catalogue of comparable drachms in the catalogues of Newell, Houghton and Lorber and Mitchiner (Indo-Greek and Indo-Scythian Coinage Volume I) reveals no example of an Ai Khanoum drachm of the Seleucid or Diodotid period with a weight in excess of 4.31 grams. Most examples are appreciably less than 4.2 grams. Jenkins (p. 54) noted that the anomalously high weight of 4.56-4.64 grams characterised two fake drachms in the La Berre collection that match lot 4166 in terms of description.

Dies: With absolute certainty, the coin is struck from the same dies as a gold stater SNG ANS 70 (refer Pl. 4 SNG ANS Part 9 Greco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek Coins). The reverse die is characterised by an anomalous style with unusually bold dots or beads that delimit the letters of the legend and the ornamentation of the omphalos. The comparable elements on established genuine coins are more subtly executed than those on Lot 4166. Jenkins commented that on the fake coins of this type… ‘The reverse may be compared with that of the genuine coins in the BM and we note once again the comparatively flat and feeble modelling.’ To my knowledge there is no known authentic example of a Seleucid drachm of the period of Antiochos II struck from the same dies as a gold stater.

Diameter: The utilisation of dies from the larger diameter gold stater necessitates a larger than usual diameter silver drachm flan to fully accommodate the images. Lot 4166 is 17 mm in diameter, in contrast to the more usual 14-15 mm of contemporaneous Seleucid drachms issued from Ai Khanoum. By way of comparison SC 618/ESM 710, the type to which this coin was attributed in the description of Lot 4166 is 14-15 mm in diameter based on the illustrations of the coin in Houghton and Lorber (Seleucid Coins) and Newell (Eastern Seleucid Mints).

Visual Diagnostics: Two small spherical beads of metal clearly visible under magnification and also on the photo image of the coin. They are located respectively on the obverse and reverse. The first is evident at ca 9h immediately behind the outermost strand of Antiochos hair. The second is present between the lyre and shin of Apollo. Both are spherical beads that cannot be associated with die wear. They are more suggestive of air bubbles entrained in a mould from which the coin was cast. Additionally, from the photo of the coin, one might infer the presence of an edge seem. However, this is a photographic artefact that results from the abrupt transition from a flat coin face to the more curved coin edge. In hand specimen this transition is unlike anything seen on authentic Ai Khanoum issues. It has a "modern" character to it suggestive of pressing, or alternatively of moulds taken from a pressed hoist coin.

These are the only directly visible diagnostics of fakery, the balance of the argument depending on more subtle numismatic conventions and standards applicable to this coin type.

Stack's accepted the above analysis and refunded the auction proceeds on return of the coin.

For those interested in Jenkins article on Bactrian Forgeries a copy (without plates unfortunately) can be downloaded from
http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home/prescript/article/numi_0484-8942_1965_num_6_7_923

http://www.forumancientcoins.com/fakes/displayimage.php?pos=-8089

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CoinForgeryDiscussionList/message/26787
  Seleukos 3. Jan. 2011, 05:42
  Seleukos 3. Jan. 2011, 05:41