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ID: 460432







Source

Gemini, LLC

Auction Auction VII (09.01.2011)
Lot 638  ( «  |  » )
Estimate 750 USD
Price 1400 USD

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Description

Armenia. Tigranes VI. (II, Herodian). Great-Grandson of Herod the Great. First Reign, 60-62 AD. AE 19, 5.56g. (h). . Obv: Head of Tigranes VI facing right with long pointed beard and wearing tiara. Rx: ΒΑCΙΛΕΩC ΤΙΓΡΑΝΟΥ ΜΕΓΑΛΟΥ Winged Nike standing right holding a wreath in her raised right hand. Kovacs, AJN 20, 2008, 14. Nercessian, ACV 162-163. Bedoukian, CAA 148. Hendin, 5th Edition, p. 273, pl. 7.9. Fine+.

Tigranes II (VI of Armenia) was the great-grandson of Herod the Great, and like his uncle, Tigranes I, was raised in Rome. Tigranes was appointed king of Armenia by Nero as a result of Corbulos’s victory over then king Tiridates. The most significant event of Tigranes’s short reign was his attack on the kingdom of Adiabene, a long-standing vassel of Persia, and somewhat ironically, great supporters of the Jewish people. (The royal family of Adiabene had recently converted to Judaism.) Although Tigranes soon lost the throne through a political arrangement with Parthia, there is both historical and numismatic evidence that Nero planned to restore his position. However, the plan to retake Armenia disintegrated with the outbreak of the Jewish War in AD 66. Tigranes’s fate is not recorded, but his descendants remained highly influential in Roman affairs into the second century, and represent the last traceable branch of the Herodian dynasty (Kokkinos, p. 263) .